simonsaquascapeblog:

Moss
Wonderful Landscape-Arrangement by Karleigh Thompson.
There`s more from her here

simonsaquascapeblog:

Moss

Wonderful Landscape-Arrangement by Karleigh Thompson.

There`s more from her here

justnickofficial:

for more, check out: www.justnick.tk

gravity-gravity:

Scandinavian living room with exposed brick wall

(Source: mslovejoy)

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  2. Aperture: f/10
  3. Exposure: 1/10th
  4. Focal Length: 27mm

terraspirit:

The Sea of Gold by WaveFaber

clean-eating-queen:

Breakfast this morning was this beauty! Blueberries and banana are defo one of my favorite combinations! <3 Topped with some mixed nuts and sesame seeds, this was nutritious and filling yummm!

30g water-cooked oats

1 medium banana

2 handfuls blueberries

handful nuts

sprinkle sesame seeds

heaven <3

  1. Camera: iPhone 5
  2. Aperture: f/2.4
  3. Exposure: 1/20th
  4. Focal Length: 4mm
ancientart:

A few examples of Roman glass at the MET.
The garland bowl shown in the first image is, in my opinion, one of the finest example of Roman glass preserved for us today. Dating to the reign of Augustus in the first century, it has by some miracle remained essentially intact, except for a small chip to the rim and some weathering on the exterior. It is made up of four separate slices of translucent glass: blue, yellow, purple, and colourless. As you can see, each segment was then decorated with a small strip of millefiori glass which depict a garland hanging from an opaque white cord. It is extremely rare indeed that large sections of glass from antiquity were made up of different coloured glass. As the MET notes: it is also the only example that combines the technique with millefiori decoration. As such it represents the peak of the glass worker’s skill at producing cast vessels.
The two-handled bottle second shown is early Imperial, dating to the 1st century AD. The jug in the shape of a bunch of grapes is late Imperial, dating to about the 3rd century AD.
Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections: 91.1.1402, 17.194.157 &amp; 17.194.253.
ancientart:

A few examples of Roman glass at the MET.
The garland bowl shown in the first image is, in my opinion, one of the finest example of Roman glass preserved for us today. Dating to the reign of Augustus in the first century, it has by some miracle remained essentially intact, except for a small chip to the rim and some weathering on the exterior. It is made up of four separate slices of translucent glass: blue, yellow, purple, and colourless. As you can see, each segment was then decorated with a small strip of millefiori glass which depict a garland hanging from an opaque white cord. It is extremely rare indeed that large sections of glass from antiquity were made up of different coloured glass. As the MET notes: it is also the only example that combines the technique with millefiori decoration. As such it represents the peak of the glass worker’s skill at producing cast vessels.
The two-handled bottle second shown is early Imperial, dating to the 1st century AD. The jug in the shape of a bunch of grapes is late Imperial, dating to about the 3rd century AD.
Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections: 91.1.1402, 17.194.157 &amp; 17.194.253.
ancientart:

A few examples of Roman glass at the MET.
The garland bowl shown in the first image is, in my opinion, one of the finest example of Roman glass preserved for us today. Dating to the reign of Augustus in the first century, it has by some miracle remained essentially intact, except for a small chip to the rim and some weathering on the exterior. It is made up of four separate slices of translucent glass: blue, yellow, purple, and colourless. As you can see, each segment was then decorated with a small strip of millefiori glass which depict a garland hanging from an opaque white cord. It is extremely rare indeed that large sections of glass from antiquity were made up of different coloured glass. As the MET notes: it is also the only example that combines the technique with millefiori decoration. As such it represents the peak of the glass worker’s skill at producing cast vessels.
The two-handled bottle second shown is early Imperial, dating to the 1st century AD. The jug in the shape of a bunch of grapes is late Imperial, dating to about the 3rd century AD.
Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections: 91.1.1402, 17.194.157 &amp; 17.194.253.

ancientart:

A few examples of Roman glass at the MET.

The garland bowl shown in the first image is, in my opinion, one of the finest example of Roman glass preserved for us today. Dating to the reign of Augustus in the first century, it has by some miracle remained essentially intact, except for a small chip to the rim and some weathering on the exterior. It is made up of four separate slices of translucent glass: blue, yellow, purple, and colourless. As you can see, each segment was then decorated with a small strip of millefiori glass which depict a garland hanging from an opaque white cord. It is extremely rare indeed that large sections of glass from antiquity were made up of different coloured glass. As the MET notes: it is also the only example that combines the technique with millefiori decoration. As such it represents the peak of the glass worker’s skill at producing cast vessels.

The two-handled bottle second shown is early Imperial, dating to the 1st century AD. The jug in the shape of a bunch of grapes is late Imperial, dating to about the 3rd century AD.

Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections91.1.140217.194.157 & 17.194.253.

terraspirit:

Slot Canyon Awe by GingerichPhotoArt

  1. Camera: Nikon D7000
  2. Aperture: f/4.5
  3. Exposure: 1/80th
  4. Focal Length: 20mm